Sunday Sea-bathing.

Sunday morning was a strange one, as I looked out my window and was greeted with a blanket of mist across the countryside. I had arranged to meet a friend to go for a dip in the sea and I was starting to regret my decision. Luckily, as I drove closer to the sea, the mist was clearing to reveal blue skies and sunshine. The steps down to the water was bustling with sea swimmers, young and old. This was my first time in the sea since August and I was really excited but also not looking forward to the coldness of the water. I walked in slow to start and then jumped in…..it was a shock to the system to say the least!

It was thrilling and freezing. It was exhilarating and freezing. It was cleansing and freezing. And then finally the cold went away, my thoughts washed away with the waves and I was left with calmness. This moment made it all worth it, even though my feet were still tingling. With the sunshine on my face, the view of the misty Carlingford Lough, the Mourne and Cooley Mountains, the waves and the other swimmers, it was all pretty special. It was amazing to appreciate the sea like this when I am so lucky to live so close. Afterwards, my mind was clear and motivated and my body was relaxed and all aches and pains were gone. Nature really can be a healer, mentally and physically. Needless to say, I want to make this a regular part of my life!

I’ll be honest… I lasted less than 10 minutes but it’s a good start.

Want some Jelly with your Ice-cream?

There is nothing more typical of my Northern Irish culture than to head to the beach on my day off work to enjoy an ice-cream, most likely a 99.

So yesterday I ventured out to two local beaches for a short stroll. Firstly, I visited Greencastle Beach and then I went on to Cranfield Beach, both of which lie on the shores of Carlingford Lough. Both beaches are popular for leisure and Greencastle has a working ferry and lots of smaller boats anchored along the shore.

I am pretty sure that the first time I had every seen a Jellyfish was on Greencastle Beach and yesterdays experience did not disappoint. To my surprise the beach was flocked with small Moon Jellyfish (Aurelia aurita)ย  also called Common Jellyfish. True to its name, this species is a very common sight around British and Irish shores and it is this species that I have seen before. They can be identified by their four purple rings that can be seen very clearly within their whitish translucent bodies. Their sting is very weak and should not be too much of a problem for people in the water or on the shore.

Moon Jellyfish/ Common Jellyfish (Aurelia Aurita)

As I walked further along the waterline I found larger jellyfish that I had never seen before and they are the Lion’s Mane Jellyfish (Cyanea capillata). These are very impressive with their bright orange/red colour and are the largest jelly species in the world. Although the Lion’s Mane prefer cooler waters it is becoming more common to find them stranded along British and Irish coastlines. This species comes with a powerful sting in and out of the water so great care must be taken when visiting the beach during the Summer months.

Lion’s Mane Jellyfish (Cyanea capillata)

As I arrived at Cranfield Beach there was a noticeable difference between the beaches in relation to stranded Jellyfish. Cranfield and Greencastle are only minutes from each other but there are vast differences, Cranfield is a Blue-Flag Beach and Greencastle has a more rocky shore and pebbled beach. Although I did spot some Jellyfish on Cranfield, they were much smaller and it was mainly the Moon Jellyfish present here. I spotted one Blue Jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii) on the beach and I didn’t see any of the Lion’s Mane Jellyfish. The Blue Jellyfish is small and translucent like the Moon Jelly but has a more vivid Blue colour on it. This species has a mild sting which has been compared to that of a Nettle sting.

blue jellyfish.JPG
Blue Jellyfish (Cyanea lamarckii)

I found it astonishing to see so many Jellyfish but very sad that they had to be stranded for me to see them. Unfortunately, most of the individuals that I seen yesterday will have dehydrated and died before the tide came back for them. Only the larger individuals will have had a fighting chance. As they float along in currents, they are quite defenceless to stranding between tides.

So appreciate the beauty of these Jellyfish but from a distance as even when stranded they can still sting.

What to do if you have been stung by a Jellyfish;

  • If in water, get out immediately
  • If there are any stingers left in your skin, remove them if possible as they will continue to sting you
  • Apply heat to relieve pain
  • Take paracetamol to relieve pain
  • If pain persists, seek medical attention
  • DO NOT URINATE ON THE STING (This is a MYTH and will not help in any way)

For more information follow the link below providing information from the NHS;

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/jellyfish-and-other-sea-creature-stings/

Let me get to the point………….. Killowen Point that is!!

With a strong background in all things Environmental, I am always looking to understand the land and sea on this amazing planet. During my studies, I tended to focus on coastal landscapes as they appealed to me the most. This is probably because I grew up close to the shores of Carlingford Lough and was always finding a feature that astounded me. So, when I started to learn about the influences of wave action on the coastline I began identifying the reasons behind certain features found along Carlingford Lough.

Most people understand that beaches are formed due to the friction inflicted on the coastline by the waves and tides of the ocean. Not only is the shape of a beach influenced by the wave action, but the beach slope and sediment size are too. Where wave action is not as powerful, you would normally find larger sediment on the coastline like pebbles and this is what is typical along most of Carlingford Lough. Some areas of the Lough shores have sand but mostly it is shingle beach with lots of seaweed washing up along the highwater mark.

One of the features that always amazed me was Killowen Point, a place that I visited numerous times but was always impressed by. The point looks like a big arm extending into the Lough and it raises the question of how this can happen. I know that it is a simple process of erosion and deposition which is occurring constantly, but it still intrigues me. The tip of the point is submerged during high tide and can only be seen fully during low tide. I find it so interesting to see how the point will change over time, if I will easily notice changes to its length or shape.

I love that in the photo I took down at the waters edge, that you can see a perfect curvature of the high watermark, proving how special and unique our coastlines can be. On the same day I took a photo of the water as I was pleasantly surprised at how clear the water was at this location. Living around a harbour town notorious for a lot of shipping traffic, seaweed and mud, the waters mostly seem murky around Carlingford Lough, so this was a welcome new experience. The photo looking down on Killowen Point was taken along the slopes of Slieve Martin (Sliabh Mรกrtain) which shows the Point in all its glory during low tide. From here you can see a lot of Carlingford Lough and you will start to notice that there are other land formations along the shores that mimic this one at Killowen Point, however they are all man-made. You can see piers and slipways on either side of the Lough but Killowen Point is a naturally occurring deposition of sediment over time which has created a permanent sandbank.

Over the centuries construction has occurred along coastlines worldwide to create promenades and walk ways and sadly it took a long time for the negative impacts of this to be recognised. But here, in Killowen, nature created her very own walkway towards Carlingford Lough for people to use and enjoy.